MOB Saved in 2016 N2E

view of side of boat

MOB perspective from water; photo © 2016 Longpre Photos

In the 2016 Newport to Ensenada International Yacht Race (#N2E), Foil, a Farr 40, sailed fast through the dark and windy night. Under spinnaker, she was making about 12 knots in winds gusting to 20 knots. Out by the Coronado Islands, the boat rounded down; helmsman Val G. went overboard. He broke his clavicle (collarbone) on the way. Foil owner, Gordon Leon, told crew to throw the dan buoy to Val.

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MOB Saved in 2016 N2E was last modified: June 18th, 2016 by Philip Thompson

USCG Auxiliary Directive to local vessel examiners on Sirius Signal C-1001 visual distress signal.

  • …Vessel Examiners should be aware of the capabilities and approvals of the SIRIUS SOS C-1001 electronic distress light… (continues)
USCG Auxiliary Directive on Sirius C1001 was last modified: March 15th, 2016 by Philip Thompson

Man Overboard Recovery Gear

MOB crew being horizontally lifted from water

New affordable SOS Marine™ Recovery Ladder™: MOB climbs ladder, or you parbuckle lift (shown)

In this article, we compare MOB recovery gear. Devices vary in ease of use and suitability for a particular rescue. Having the right gear improves odds of rescue. Practice helps too!

A soft device, rather than a swimstep or rigid boarding ladder, reduces chance of injury when the boat rolls.

Some units retrieve non–hypothermic crew by hoisting head first.1  Lifesling and Reelsling are examples of this type of device.

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Man Overboard Recovery Gear was last modified: June 18th, 2016 by Philip Thompson